Hanna Jubran: The Cycle is from a series of sculpture I have been creating for the past five years. This work represents the cycle of the seasons and the four elements (Earth, Water, Wind and Fire). The orange color represents warmth, heat and growth. This is a more universal meaning. The overall form represents a gate that has opened and is pivoting on the earth. The two forms are in opposition to each other and are placed to create a dynamic sculptural composition. For more on Hanna Jubran and his work, please visit hannajubran.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

Aaron Hussey: Pharaoh is inspired by historical use of the figure as part of architecture and the artifacts buried with deceased. The work was completed over several months; creating the figurative part in wax, then taking it through the bronze casting process. As with all of my art, I want the audience to approach the work with their own life experiences and thoughts.The audience members should take from the work an individual response that relates to their world. For more on Aaron P. Hussey and his work, please visit Aphstudio.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

Nathan S. Pierce: My religion is nature and I spent a lot of time that summer canoeing up and down the rivers but at the same time I was also going through some personal struggles concerning where I was going in life, Or was I going anywhere? The challenge was self-discovery. This particular piece Has a very personal narrative attached to it. For more on Nathan S. Pierce and his work, please visit NSPsculpture.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

Greely Myatt: This piece was inspired from art history and the vernacular environment in which I live and work. Each piece has its own challenges. For ZIPCODE, it was in the fitting of the pieces. I would hope folks look at my work with an open mind and a happy heart! For more on Greely Myatt and his work, please visit davidluskgallery.com/artists/greely.myatt. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

Shawn Morin: The original idea centered around this piece is the tri-unity of God, as there is another Flame that was part of the initial piece which was called Three Flames.Every viewer comes to a work of art with their own interpretation and understanding. It is my contention that the creation of artwork is not Unlike the creation of the universe. I hope that when people see my work, They come to an understanding that both the creation and viewing of artwork is A highly spiritual experience and as such, can point us back to God and his creative qualities. For more on Shawn Morin and his work, please visit Shawnmorinsculpture.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

DeeDee Morrison: "The Charm sculpture series focuses on the correlation of contrasts - two very different elements that are inter-related and combined to create equilibrium. The creation of the Charm sculptures begin with a limestone rock that has been harvested from the quarry where I work. I used laser cutting processes with the metal that introduced light and a sense of weightlessness into the piece. Symbols, such as unevenly balanced objects joined ask the question, "What am I bound to?" I work with this quality of extreme contrasts through the creation of bulky sculptures made of metal and boulders that are intricately balanced with hand wrought chains to create a sense of the weight of fragility and balance." For more on Deedee Morrison and her work, please visit Deedeemorrisonsculpture.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

John Ellis: "What would you hope the audience takes away from your piece? This is a question which leads to another question. What should my hope be? I have thought about this often and have not produced an iron-clad answer. Art in general has the capacity to engage us in unknown ways. From the cave paintings to Pollack's swirling masterpieces and on into today's work, curators and historians have tried to explain to us what to think regarding the viewing of works of art, yet there is no way of being certain about any of it. My most basic, and I feel realistic hope, would be for someone to walk away with a sense of curiosity. The stage of curiosity is the beginning of many good things in our exploration of life." For more on John Ellis and his work, please visit Steelmeditations.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.

Cliff Tresner: I began using words in art to work through formal writing issues, primarily in drawing. In 2007 the words became part of my sculptural concerns. I would hope an audience comes to my piece with curiosity and questioning. It is not about what I am trying to say or do, it is about what the viewer takes away from the work, or gives to the work through discussion. For more on Cliff Tresner and his work, please visit Clifftresner.com. For more on the Jimmy & Hazel Sanders Sculpture Garden, please visit sculpturegardenms.com.